Word of the Day: baffle

Améliorez votre anglais avec les mot du jour de Groupetude. N'oubliez pas nos cours de conversation, 2 fois par semaine, en ligne ! Vous aussi pouvez devenir bilingue !

It’s baffling, but this is the first time that I really feel like I need a garden!

If you baffle someone, it means that you puzzle them, or make them a bit confused. When you’re baffled, you are surprised or taken aback. It means that the situation or person is strange and has made you stop and think.

You can describe something or someone as baffling. For example: his behavior is baffling.

Have you got any questions? Are you baffled? Leave us a comment and we’ll get back to you!

Grammar Mondays: modals 6

Améliorez votre anglais avec nos Grammar Mondays; chaque semaine, une nouvelle astuce avec Groupetude !

The modal may is used to express two things: politeness and possibility.

In terms of possibility, it can replace might, though might is more commonly used than may in this context.

More often, school children learn that may is used for good manners. For example, rather than using the modal can when asking for something, use may:

  • May I have another cookie please?
  • May I go to the bathroom? (A child asking at school.)
  • May I leave the table?
  • May I? (Said simply when it is obvious what the question is, for example, when you’re indicating that you’d like to offer your help.)
  • How may I help you? (If you’re a shop assistant speaking to a customer.)

Do you have any questions? Leave them in the comments, or email me directly!

Friday Idiom: under the weather

Améliorez votre anglais avec des expressions idiomatiques chaque vendredi avec Groupetude !

« I’m feeling a bit under the weather today, so I don’t think I’ll make it to your party. »

« Josh can’t come to school today because he’s a little under the weather, I’d like him to rest. »

If you’re feeling « under the weather » it means that you’re not at your best. Use it within a sentence when you’d like to tell someone that you’re not feeling well. It generally means you have a cold, and isn’t used for more serious illnesses.

Word of the Day: remote

Améliorez votre anglais avec notre mot du jour !
Okay

Okay, for this word, there are at least a couple of useful meanings.

Remote, as per the definition above, means far away and/or secluded. So, we might say that a person lives in a remote part of the world. That could be a village in the mountains somewhere, an island in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, or in the middle of the woods somewhere in Canada!

Another meaning for the word remote is the thing you use to change the channel on your TV! Technically, it’s called a remote control. Can you guess why? That’s right! It’s because you change the channel remotely, ie., from far away! Of course, most of the time, we just say: « Pass the remote. » Everyone will know what you’re talking about, you don’t generally need to add the « control » part.

Have you got any questions? Have you got more examples? Drop us a line!

Grammar Mondays: modals 5

Améliorez votre grammaire anglaise avec nos astuces tous les lundis !

Might reflects possibility. We use this modal if we are unsure that something will or will not happen.

For example, if you’re unsure of your plans for the evening, you could say: I might go out, but I’m not sure.

If you’re unsure if you’d like to go out, you could also say: I might not go tonight, we’ll see.

Whether you use the affirmative or negative form is really up to you and how you want to spin your sentence. Do you want to emphasize that you might NOT do something (you’re leaning towards no)? Or that you might do something (you’re leaning towards yes)?

Give it a try, and don’t forget, if you have questions, give us a shout!

Grammar Mondays: adjectives 6

Améliorez votre grammaire anglaise avec Grammar Mondays de Groupetude !

The rule of thumb with these simple comparisons in English is:

object of comparison + adj. (comparative adjective, or more + adj.) + than + other object of comparison.

Strawberries taste better than bananas.

or

Physics is more interesting than Physical Education.

Okay, so it looks a little complicated, but it’s not once you get the hang of it.

The easiest way forward is to memorize a comparative sentence you feel comfortable with, then simply replace its adjective with others that you want to use.

Can you make any comparative sentences? Go ahead, give it a try. And ask for help if you need it!

Friday Idiom: put your foot in it

Learn a new English idiom every Friday with Groupetude! Today's idiom: to put your foot in it.

Alright, so let’s have an example. You might say that you’ve put your foot in it if you accidentally tell someone about their surprise birthday party. Or, your best friend told you have she’s pregnant, but that no one else knows yet, then you go off and spill the beans at Friday night drinks!

It’s important to remember that this expression is used when you say something you shouldn’t have by accident, if you do it on purpose, it doesn’t work!

So, can you think of a time when you really put your foot in it? I certainly can, that’s also why I don’t really like it when people tell me secrets!

Newsletter: week 12

Weekly English Fix

This week: Chocolate Chip and Banana Muffins

Photo by Taylor Grote

By Klaudyna Piatek March 22, 2021

Wonderful news everyone, we are now an official business and have received our temporary SIRET number! And, what better way to celebrate than by baking Chocolate Chip and Banana Muffins this Saturday, March 27th?! Join us for this week’s workshop and delight in the deliciousness of these scrumptious muffins! 

Also, don’t forget that you can now sign your children up for our online English lessons over the Easter holidays. We will play games, learn about music, talk about films and help them find their comfort zone in English. Each lesson is 45 minutes long, for elementary aged children we offer 1 lesson per day; for middle and high school, it is 2 lessons per day, Monday to Friday. 

Don’t miss them! 

THIS WEEK’S

TOP STORIES

Spread the love! 10 scrumptious Marmite recipes, from roast potatoes to spaghetti

Stuart Heritage

https://www.theguardian.com/food/2021/mar/22/10-scrumptious-marmite-recipes-roast-potatoes-spaghetti

Okay, Marmite is really not my thing, but I think that we should all be open to trying new foods and experiencing other cultures. So, have a go! Read about all the different ways that you can prepare Marmite, and who knows, maybe you’re one of the lovers?!


Arrests after 6,000 people gather for illegal ‘carnival’ in Marseille

https://www.thelocal.fr/20210322/arrests-after-6000-people-gather-for-illegal-carnival-in-marseille/

Want to read about French news in English? Try out The Local. Here’s an article to get you started about the recent “carnival” in Marseille! 

THIS WEEK’S

TOP TIPS

Long Term Improvement

I recently saw a post on Facebook advertising Yoga in English. I think that’s a great idea. Pick an activity that you enjoy, and do it in English, or in whatever language you are trying to learn! It’s important to find enjoyment in language learning and it doesn’t really matter how you do it as long as you get to practice enough. 

Vocabulary

I have been learning lots of new words lately by reading books with my young son. Children’s books are great because they’re often written in a very rhythmic way, they rhyme, and we tend to read them aloud! Great practice! 

Grammar Spot

Since I mentioned reading in the vocabulary advice above, I’ll mention it here too. While I was learning French, reading books with lots of dialogue really helped me understand how to use the imparfait and pasé composé tenses. They helped because I could follow the conversation on my own time, and I didn’t have to worry about interrupting the people speaking to ask about a word. Dialogue-rich novels are fabulous! 

GroupEtude SARL

21 AV Jean Giono

13090, Aix en Provence

Our Brownie Bonanza Workshop

Today’s workshop was a delicious success!

We spent an hour this morning baking up a tasty batch of brownies, pictured here 🙂

From some fun baking idioms, to our final chocolatey result, getting up this Saturday morning for our 10am meet-up has surely sweetened up everyone’s day!

Happy week-ending everybody, see you Monday for our Grammar Spot!