Weekly English Fix

This week don’t miss international English Language Day!

Venez étudier la langue de Shakespeare avec nous et découvrez non seulement une langue mais aussi des cultures!
Jessica Pamp on Unsplash

By Klaudyna Piatek April 19th, 2021

Isn’t that picture wonderful? I mean, a mural of Shakespeare and a tuba player. I just LOVE it! 

This week, don’t miss international English Language Day. Now I know that Shakespeare has a tendency to epitomize all things English, but this time, I’d like to recommend some other gems you’ll find in the English language. 

Let’s start off with Maya Angelou. Oh dear, how I love her poetry and her books. I wouldn’t quite recommend her work to anyone under a B2 level, because some of the slang she uses might prove difficult. 

Next, and because I’ve read several of his books recently, I’ll recommend David Sedaris. I think you could go ahead and read him from a strong A2 level. He’s direct, funny and easy to read. Plus, he doesn’t write novels so if you miss something it’s not the end of the world, you can just move on to the next short essay. 

For your preteens, and honestly, for you too because I thoroughly enjoyed this novel, I’ll say Coraline by Neil Gaiman. There’s also a stop motion movie that’s excellent! Really, I love most things by Neil Gaiman, he also writes children’s books which my son gobbles up. 

For kids, I adore Julia Donaldson. Oh my, she has written so much; I’ve never come across one of her picture books that I (or my kid) didn’t like! 

Do you want another one? Tina Fey’s memoir totally made me laugh! I listened to it on my commute to and from work a few years ago and was in stitches. This is also one that a strong A2 or let’s say, a B1 level learner can apprehend. 

Ok well there we are. There will be more posts this week in celebration of English Language Day so look out for them! 

Groupetude News

In other news, if you enjoy cooking, why not come and cook with us in French every Thursday evening at 6PM Paris time? Or, if you’re learning English, don’t forget we’ve also got our free baking sessions every second Saturday at 10AM. 

Not sure if you’re ready to invest in a course? Try a week for free and see how you like it. 

Also, join our Facebook group Groupetude Community with the secret code: learn together and get the chance to win 3 one on one lessons! 

Don’t miss this opportunity guys!


THIS WEEK’S

TOP STORIES

The French greetings and farewells that foreigners commonly get wrong

Photo by INA FASSBENDER / AFP

https://www.thelocal.fr/20210409/the-french-greetings-and-farewells-that-foreigners-commonly-get-wrong/

Just starting to learn French? Then let’s begin with Bonjour, it’s simple, but there are a few things to remember. This article gets it quite right, I think.

The Great British Art Tour: Chagall leaves his dreams for a living  nightmare     

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/19/the-great-british-art-tour-chagall-apocalypse-en-lilas-ben-uri-gallery

A little culture? If you click on the article, the journalist will tell you that if we can’t go to museums, then why not bring the art to us? I think it’s a good point, and since I like Chagall, why not a picture by him?

FYI, if you’re ever in Nice, go to the Chagall museum in Cimiez, it’s small, and makes for a pleasant visit. Also, while you’re there, you could take the time to explore the neighborhood and look at the beautiful early 20th Century architecture; I was particularly drawn to the soffits (the underside of an eave), with their intricate designs and patterns. 


THIS WEEK’S

TOP TIPS

Long Term Improvement

Join a group! Ok, I’m biased because I’ve just opened Groupetude Community, but seriously. Join a group, you’ll see that you’ll get much further at a faster pace if you are part of a good community of learners who are there to help and support you. Especially in the Pandemic times when it’s difficult to get out and meet new people to practice with! 

Vocabulary

Did you know that every online dictionary has a Word of the Day? Why not sign up to get one in your inbox? It can’t hurt right, even if you don’t remember every  new word!

Grammar Spot

Did you know that in French, the days of the week and the names of the different months are always written in lowercase (unless at the start of a sentence, of course)? As opposed to English, where the days and months are always written in the uppercase. Sometimes, it’s the little things that can make a big difference! 


Ok, do you have any questions? Drop me line, I’ll get back to you ASAP! 

Groupetude SARL

21 AV Jean Giono

13090, Aix en Provence

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